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20th-century Indian male writers


Lalji Kanpariya

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Lalji Kanpariya

Lalji Kanpariya is a Gujarati poet from Gujarat, India. Lalji Kanpariya was born on 13 August 1943 in Vitthalpur village in Amreli district, Gujarat, India. He taught at Prataprai Arts College before retirement.[1][2] He writes geet, ghazal, metre and non-metre poetry. His first collection of poems Zalmal Tanu (1994) received Jayant Pathak Kavita Prize and prize by Gujarati Sahitya Parishad. His second poetry collection Nava Chandrani Kumpal (1999) received Raskavi Raghunath Brahmabhatt Award and Ramesh Parekh Sahitya Ratna Award. His other collections are Shamanana Chitaraman (2005), Harina Hastakshar (2006) and Surya Chandrani Sakhe (2007).[1][2] References Brahmabhatt, Prasad (2010). અર્વાચીન ગુજરાતી સાહિત્યનો ઈતિહાસ - આધુનિક અને અનુઆધુનિક યુગ (History of Modern Gujarati Literature – Modern and Postmodern Era) (in Gujarati). Ahmedabad: Parshwa Publication. p. 123. ISBN 978-93-5108-247-7. "લાલજી કાનપરિયા (Lalji Kanpariya)". Gujarati Sahitya Parishad (in Gujarati). Retrieved 25 January 2017.

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CS1 Gujarati-language sources (gu)

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People from Amreli district

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Raj Kanwar

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Raj Kanwar

Raj Kanwar (Hindi: राज कंवर; c. 28 June 1961 – 3 February 2012) was a Bollywood film director, writer and film producer based in Mumbai, India. Career Kanwar began his career directing plays in Delhi. He then moved to Mumbai where he worked as an assistant to directors like Raj Kumar Santoshi. His directorial debut was Deewana. Released in 1992, the film was a box office Blockbuster and marked the screen debut of Shahrukh Khan. He directed several other box office hits like Laadla (1994), Jaan (1996), Jeet (1996), Judaai (1997), Daag: The Fire (1999) and Badal (2000). Kanwar went on to discover actors like Lara Dutta and Priyanka Chopra whom he cast in his film Andaaz in 2003.[1] His last film was Sadiyaan (2010). Personal life The veteran filmmaker, Raj and Anita Kanwar had two sons, Karan Raj Kanwar and Abhay. On 3 February 2012, he died due to a kidney ailment in Singapore. He was educated in Col. Brown Cambridge School in Dehra Dun. Filmography Director Sadiyaan (2010) Humko Deewana Kar Gaye (20

20th-century Indian male writers

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Screenwriters from Mumbai

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Screenwriters from Maharashtra

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Jaswant Singh Kanwal

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Jaswant Singh Kanwal

Jaswant Singh Kanwal in 2018 Jaswant Singh Kanwal (born 27 June 1919) is a novelist, short story writer and essayist of the Punjabi language. He was born in the village of Dhudike, Moga District, Punjab, India.[1] As a young teenager he left school and went to Malaya. It was there that he first got interested in literature. He returned to Dhudike after a few years and has lived there ever since. He was awarded the Punjabi Sahit Shiromani Award[2] in the year 2007. Writings He has published several books. His novels usually have a rustic feel and depict the rural life of Punjab very vividly. His writings generally question firmly held social customs and beliefs. He has left leanings and many of his most popular novels champion the cause of socially relevant issues like social and gender equality. He is also known to take tough political stands in his newspaper essays. Later on he became a supporter of Khalistan movement. His most notable novel is Lahoo Di Lo (Dawn of the Blood).[3] This novel is based on t

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Journalists from Punjab, India

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Novelists from Punjab, India

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K. Shivaram Karanth

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K. Shivaram Karanth

Kota Shivaram Karanth (10 October 1902 – 9 December 1997) was an Indian polymath, who was a novelist in Kannada language, playwright and conservationist. Ramachandra Guha called him the "Rabindranath Tagore of Modern India, who has been one of the finest novelists-activists since independence".[4] He was the third writer[5] to be decorated with the Jnanpith Award for Kannada, the highest literary honor conferred in India.[6] His son Ullas is a conservationist.[3] Early life Shivaram Karanth was born on 10 October 1902,[7] in Kota near Udupi in the Udupi district of Karnataka to a Kannada-speaking family. The fifth child of his parents Shesha Karantha and Lakshmamma, he completed his primary education in Kundapura and Mangalore. Shivaram Karanth was influenced by Gandhi's principles and took part in Indian Independence movement when he was in college. His participation in the Non-cooperation movement did not allow him to complete his college education which he quit in February 1922. He canvassed for khadi an

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Best Story National Film Award winners

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Special Mention (feature film) National Film Aw...

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Shamim Karhani

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Shamim Karhani

Shamim Karhani (8 June 1913 - 19 March 1975) was an eminent Urdu poet ('Shayar') of the 20th century. Early life, education and employment Shamim Karhani (Urdu: شمیم کرھانی ‎) was born in a 'Zamindar' family to Syed Muhammad Akhtar and Ummat ul Zehra on 8 June 1913 in village 'Karhan' district Mau, UP in India. His real name was 'Syed Shamsuddin Haider'. He himself chose 'Shamim Karhani' as his pen name ('Takhallus'). Later, this pen name of his became so famous that once, at an interview, when he was asked his name, he himself had to pause for a moment to remember his real name! He did his secondary education from Aligarh Muslim University and also did 'Maulvi Kamil Munshi'. For his profession, he chose to be a teacher.[1] He worked with Dayanand Anglo-Vedic Schools System, Kaumi Awaz and Anglo Arabic School (New Delhi).[1] He was a scholar of the Persian language; however he did all his poetry in Urdu. Poetry and India's freedom struggle Shamim had a taste in poetry since he was a kid. He composed his

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Poets from Uttar Pradesh

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People from Mau district

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Vinda Karandikar

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Vinda Karandikar

Govind Vinayak Karandikar (23 August 1918[1] – 14 March 2010), better known as Vindā, was a well-known Marathi poet, writer, literary critic, and translator. Early life Karandikar was born on 23 August 1918, in Dhalavali village in the Devgad taluka present-day Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra. Works Karandikar's poetic works include Svedgangā (River of Sweat) (1949), Mrudgandha (1954), Dhrupad (1959), Jātak (1968), and Virupika (1980). [2] Two anthologies of his selected poems, Sanhita (1975) and Adimaya (1990) were also published. His poetic works for children include Rānichā Bāg (1961), Sashyāche Kān (1963), and Pari Ga Pari (1965).Experimentation has been a feature of Karandikar's Marathi poems. He also translated his own poems in English, which were published as "Vinda Poems" (1975). He also modernized old Marathi literature like Dnyaneshwari and Amrutānubhawa. Besides having been a prominent Marathi poet, Karandikar has contributed to Marathi literature as an essayist, a critic, and a translator.

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Maharashtra

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Kareemullah Shah

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Kareemullah Shah

Alhaj Hazrath Kareemullah Shah (died 15 April 1913) was a Muslim Sufi, saint and scholar of the Naqshbandi order from Indian sub continent. He was born in 1838 in the city of Hyderabad. His spiritual successor was Hazrath Ghousi Shah.[1] Death He died on 15 April 1913. His grave is situated in his mosque "Masjid-E-Kareemullah Shah", Begum Bazar, behind Osmania general Hospital, Afzalgunj, Hyderabad.[1] Mazaar Shareef(Grave) of Hazrath Peer Kareemullah Shah Urs His annual Urs is organized by his present successor Moulana Ghousavi Shah (Secretary General: The Conference of World Religions & President: All India Muslim Conference) every year.[2] See also Alhaj Moulana Ghousavi Shah Hazrath Ghousi Shah Hazrath Machiliwale Shah Hazrath Mahmoodullah Shah Moulana Sahvi Shah References Tazkera-E-Kareemullah Shah(Rh). By:Haroon Shaikh Moulana Ghousavi Shah aur Ilmi Karname in Rahnuma-E-Deccan Daily Newspaper, Hyderabad, India. Dated: 4 November 2002

20th-century Indian male writers

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Writers from Hyderabad, India

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20th-century Indian poets

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Girish Karnad

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Girish Karnad

Girish Karnad (19 May 1938 – 10 June 2019)[1] was an Indian actor, film director, Kannada writer,[2] playwright and a Rhodes Scholar, who predominantly worked in South Indian cinema and Bollywood. His rise as a playwright in the 1960s, marked the coming of age of modern Indian playwriting in Kannada, just as Badal Sarkar did in Bengali, Vijay Tendulkar in Marathi, and Mohan Rakesh in Hindi.[3] He was a recipient of the 1998 Jnanpith Award, the highest literary honour conferred in India.[4] For four decades Karnad composed plays, often using history and mythology to tackle contemporary issues. He translated his plays into English and received acclaim. His plays have been translated into some Indian languages and directed by directors like Ebrahim Alkazi, B. V. Karanth, Alyque Padamsee, Prasanna, Arvind Gaur, Satyadev Dubey, Vijaya Mehta, Shyamanand Jalan, Amal Allana and Zafer Mohiuddin.[5] He was active in the world of Indian cinema working as an actor, director and screenwriter, in Hindi and Kannada cinema,

Presidents of the Oxford Union

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Best Original Screenplay National Film Award wi...

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Krushna Chandra Kar

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Krushna Chandra Kar

Krushna Chandra Kar (1907–1995) was an Indian poet and literary critic who has written both in the Odia and English.[1] He has authored books on Odia literature and inspired other writers like Bidyutprabha Devi and Chakhi Khuntia. He received a feliciation from the Odisha Sahitya Academy for his contribution to Odia literature in the year 1971 to 1972. He spent most of his life in Cuttack, Odisha. Career Krushna Chandra Kar wrote biographies, fictional works, and children's books both before and after Indian independence. He also authored an Odia to English dictionary called the "Taruna Sabdakosh"[2] and an English to Odia dictionary called the "New Method English Dictionary", which has been in use at the Stanford University Libraries. His better known Odia books include the "Ramayana" and "Shakuntala". He also authored collections of poetry, including "Rutu Samhara" and "Hansa Dutam". He was arguably best known for children's literature and wrote "Pari Raija", "Kuhuka Raija", "Panchatantra", and "Adi Jug

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Novelists from Odisha

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Poets from Odisha

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Udumalai Narayana Kavi

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Udumalai Narayana Kavi

Udumalai Narayana Kavi (1899–1981) was a tamil poet. Early life Udumalai Narayana was born on 25 September 1899 in Poolavadi, a small village in Udumalpet taluk, Tiruppur district, Tamil Nadu, India. His parents died at a very young age and poverty deprived him of school. With the help of his brother, he made a small living selling matchboxes to the nearby villages. Even when young he had a keen interest in play and music. He initially started off acting in plays at the local temple and then got connected with some leading play groups in Tamil Nadu. Today's Kollywood is an amalgamation of several of those play groups. Songwriting He is best known for writing several lyrics that were used in the freedom movement in his early days and between 1950 and 1972. He wrote lyrics for several Tamil movies.[1] Several of the movies that he wrote lyrics for were box office hits including Velaikari, Nallathambi, Poompuhar, Manohara. He was affectionately known as "Kaviraayar" in the movie industry. He was also associa

20th-century Indian male writers

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Tamil film poets

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Indian lyricists

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Pattathuvila Karunakaran

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Pattathuvila Karunakaran

Pattathuvila Karunakaran (1925–1988) was an Indian film producer and short story writer of Malayalam literature.[1] He was best known for his book, Vimarsham and for his association with the film, Uttarayanam, the directorial debut of noted filmmaker, G. Aravindan, as the film's producer and story writer. Kerala Sahitya Akademi awarded him their annual award for story in 1972. Biography Karunakaran was born on July 7, 1925[2] in Pattathuvila family in Quilon district of the south Indian state of Kerala to Kochukunju and Kochukunjali.[3] After schooling at Craven School, Quilon and subsequent graduation from Presidency College Madras, he joined the Government Law College, Thiruvananthapuram but did not complete the course. He started his career as a journalist with Kerala Kaumudi, but soon quit the job to pursue studies in business administration at Syracuse University in the USA from where he earned a master's degree in business administration. On his return to Kerala, he joined the Calicut branch of Pierse

Presidency College, Chennai alumni

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20th-century Indian male writers

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20th-century Indian short story writers

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Kattakayam Cherian Mappillai

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Kattakayam Cherian Mappillai

Kattakayam Cherian Mappillai (1859–1936) was an Indian poet and playwright of Malayalam literature. He was known for the epic poem Shreeyeshu Vijayam, which earned him the title of Mahakavi. He was the founder editor of Vijnaana Rathnaakaram, one of the earliest literary magazines in Malayalam language. Pope Pius XI presented him a gold medal in 1931. Biography Cherian Mappillai was born on February 24, 1859 in Pala in Kottayam district of the south Indian state of Kerala in a Christian family to Ulahannan and Cecily.[1] His schooling was limited to Sanskrit studies with Njavakkattu Damodaran Kartha for a few years by which time, he had already started writing poems. His early poems were published in Nasrani Deepika magazine in 1887 and in 1980, he started a poetry column in Malayala Manorama, encouraged by Kandathil Varghese Mappillai, the founder of the daily.[1] He wrote a number of poems and plays[2] and the most known among them was Shree Yeshu Vijayam,[3] a mahakavya in 24 cantos on the Bible,[4] deta

People from Pala

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20th-century Indian male writers

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Dramatists and playwrights from Kerala

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Kavi Kant

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Kavi Kant

Manishankar Ratnji Bhatt (Gujarati: મણિશંકર રત્નજી ભટૃ), popularly known as Kavi Kant (Gujarati: કવિ કાન્ત) was a Gujarati poet, playwright and essayist. He is an innovator of Khandkavya, a typical Gujarati poetic form and narration of one episode. His book Purvalap (1923) is a landmark in Gujarati poetry.[1] Life Kavi Kant was born in Prashnora Brahman Family on 20 November 1867 in Chavand, a village in Amreli Prant of Baroda state, to Motibahen and Ratnaji Bhatt. His family's influence left him with a deep interest in both education and philosophy. He was a student of both Hindu and Biblical philosophy. He took his primary education at Mangrol, Morbi and Rajkot. He completed his Bachelor of Arts in 1888 from Bombay University with Logic and Moral philosophy subjects. He served as a teacher at Surat in 1889. From 1890 to 1898, he served as Professor and then Vice principal at Kalabhavan, Vadodara.[2] He was on tour to Kashmir in 1923. While returning to Lahore from Rawalpindi in train, he died en route on

20th-century Indian male writers

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CS1 Gujarati-language sources (gu)

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Poets from Gujarat

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Yusufali Kechery

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Yusufali Kechery

Yusufali Kechery (Yūsaphali Kēccēri; 16 May 1934 – 21 March 2015) was a poet, film lyricist, film producer and director from Kerala, India. He was one of the leading poets of the modern era of Malayalam poetry and won numerous awards including Odakkuzhal Award, Kerala Sahitya Academy Award and Vallathol Award. He was born in 1934 in Kechery in Trichur district of the Kingdom of Cochin (now in Kerala, India). After completing his Bachelor's degree in Arts and Law, he started his career as a lawyer and freelance writer. Professor K. P. Narayana Pisharody, a highly regarded scholar, was Yousuf Ali's Sanskrit teacher and taught him free of cost for four years. Kechery is regarded as one of the major poets of the modern era. His major poetry works include Sainaba, Aayiram Navulla Mounam, Anchu Kanyakakal, Nadabhramam, Amrithu, Kecheri Puzha, Anuragagaanam Pole, Aalila, Kadhaye Premicha Kavitha, Perariyatha Nombaram and Ahaindavam.[1] He served in the post of Assistant Secretary and Executive Member of the Kerala

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Best Lyrics National Film Award winners

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Film musicians from Kerala

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Pandalam Kerala Varma

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Pandalam Kerala Varma

Kerala Varma (January 1879 – June 1919), most commonly known as Mahakavi Pandalam Kerala Varma, was an Indian poet, scholar, and publisher. He was born at Pandalam, and belonged to the Pandalam Royal Family. He wrote two mahakavyas, more than a hundred narrative poems, translations, and children's poetry.[1] He is widely regarded as the author of the first complete mahakavya in Malayalam.[2][3] He was the owner and Chief Editor of Kavana Kaumudi, the first Malayalam periodical, which was also the first to introduce special issues in Malayalam.[4] Personal life Kerala Varma was born at Pandalam in 1879, to Kottayam Puthuppally Thrikkonamangalam Desathu Perinjeri Illathu Vishnu Namboothiri and Puthankoikkal Aswathynal Thanwangi Thamburatti.[1] He had two elder brothers and an elder sister.[1] He also had two paternal half-brothers; Neythelloor Koikkal Makayiramnal Kerala Varma Thampuran (1846–1890) and Neythelloor Kottarathil Thrikkettanal Veera Kerala Varma Thampuran.[5] Makayiramnal Kerala Varma Thampuran w

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Indian Sanskrit scholars

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Indian publishers (people)

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Gnanananda Kavi

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Gnanananda Kavi

S. T. Gnanananda Kavi is an Indian poet from the state of Telangana.[1][2][3] Life Born on 16 July 1922,[2] Kavi is credited with forty anthologies which include Dharma Graham, Vamshadhara, Aksharabhisekham, Golconda Kavyam, Kristu Prabandham and Naajeevitha Gatha and has received Andhra Pradesh Sahitya Akademi award, Paidi Laxmaiah award and Andhra Pradesh Samskruthika Samstha Hamsa Award.[3] A recipient of honorary doctorates from Andhra University in 1975 and Telugu University in 1999,[3] he was honoured by the Government of India, in 2001, with the fourth highest Indian civilian award of Padma Shri.[4] References Gnanananda Kavi (1990). The Vision in the Verses of Dr. Gnanananda Kavi. Rasagna Publications. p. 92. "Indian autographs". Indian autographs. 2014. Retrieved 5 January 2015. "FullHyd". FullHyd. 2001. Retrieved 5 January 2015. "Padma Awards" (PDF). Padma Awards. 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November 2014. External links Gnanananda K

20th-century Indian male writers

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21st-century Indian male writers

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Writers from Hyderabad, India

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TK Ramanuja Kavirajar

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TK Ramanuja Kavirajar

'Kavithendral' T.K. Ramanuja Kavirajar B.A.,B.L. (1905–1985) was a Tamil poet, Gandhian, playwright,[1] lawyer and humanitarian. This Indian writer had mastery in both English and Tamil. He wrote 14 books in Tamil and five in English. He is known for his voluminous creations, chaste language and poetic skills. He followed the principles of Mahatma Gandhi to the word and practised truthfulness. Even though he has written many books, his magnum opus is considered to be 'Mahatma Gandhi Kaaviyam', an epic on the life of Mahatma Gandhi penned in 12285 verses. This massive creation along with his other devotional works earned him the 'Kavithendral' award from the Nammakkal Kavingar award Committee. Kavirajar, as he is fondly called, went on to translate this work in English as 'Bharath reborn'. He led a simple and pious life and died at the age of 80. Early life T.K. Ramanuja Kavirajar was born in Tirunelveli on 28 December 1905 to Kallapiran and Arasalwar. He started writing poems when he was around twelve y

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People from Tirunelveli district

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Poets from Tamil Nadu

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Kader Khan

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Kader Khan

Kader Khan (Pashto: قادر خان‎ Qâder Xân; 22 October 1937 – 31 December 2018) was an Indian-Canadian film actor, screenwriter, comedian, and director. As an actor, he appeared in over 300 films after his debut film in the 1973 film Daag, starring Rajesh Khanna, in which he acted as a prosecuting attorney.[2] He was also a prolific screenwriter for Bollywood films in the period 1970s to 1999 and wrote dialogues for 200 films. Khan graduated from Ismail Yusuf College affiliated to Bombay University. Before entering the film industry in the early 1970s, he taught at M. H. Saboo Siddik College of Engineering, Mumbai, as a professor of Civil Engineering.[3] Early life and education Khan was born in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1937.[4][5] His father was Abdul Rahman Khan from Kandahar while his mother was Iqbal Begum from Pishin, British India (now in Balochistan, Pakistan). Khan had three brothers, Shams ur Rehman, Fazal Rehman and Habib ur Rehman.[6] He is an ethnic Pashtun of the Kakar tribe.[6] Khan was raised in t

Canadian people of Pashtun descent

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Recipients of the Padma Shri in arts

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Current events

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P. Kesavadev

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P. Kesavadev

P. Kesava Pillai (20 July 1904 – 1 July 1983), better known by his pen-name P. Kesavadev, was a novelist and social reformer of Kerala, India. He is remembered for his speeches, autobiographies, novels, dramas, short stories, and films. Odayil Ninnu, Nadhi, Bhrandalayam, Ayalkar (Central Academi Award-winning novel), Ethirppu (autobiography) and Oru Sundariyude Athmakadha are some among his 128 literary works. Kesavadev along with Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai and Vaikom Muhammad Basheer are considered the exponents of progressive Malayalam Literature.[1][2] Life and career Keshavadev, born Kesava Pillai, on July 21, 1904 at Kedamangalam, a small hamlet near North Paravur, in Ernakulam district of the south Indian state of Kerala, to Appu Pillai-Karthyayani Amma couple.[3] He had formal education only up to High School levels when he had to abandon it due to financial constraints and take up part time jobs such as a collection agent, tuition teacher and cloth merchant. It was during this time, he was influenc

Indian short story writers

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Indian dramatists and playwrights

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20th-century Indian male writers

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Muztar Khairabadi

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Muztar Khairabadi

Iftikhar Hussain, known by his pen name Muztar Khairabadi (Urdu: مضطر خیر آبادی‎; 1862 – 1927), was an Indian Urdu poet.[1][2] Biography Iftikhar Hussain was the grandson of Fazl-e-Haq Khairabadi, who was also a poet, philosopher, religious scholar, Arabist, Persian and Urdu writer and freedom fighter in the Indian Rebellion of 1857. Khairabadi's first mentor was his mother.[3] He spent his life in Khairabad, Tonk, Gwalior, Indore, Bhopal and Rampur. He received the titles Khan Bahadur, Eitbar-ul-Mulk, and Iftikhar-ul-Shaura.[3] He died in 1927 in Gwalior, and is buried there.[3] He was the father of poet and lyricist Jan Nisar Akhtar and grandfather of Javed Akhtar and Salman Akhtar.[4][3] His great grandchildren include Farhan Akhtar, Zoya Akhtar, and Kabir Akhtar.[4] Literary career Khairabadi wrote poetry books. He also published a literary magazine entitled Karishama-e-Dilbar.[3] Bibliography His works include:[3] Nazr-e-Khuda (in Praise of God), a poetry collection Meelaad-e-Mustafa, the co

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19th-century Indian poets

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Poets from Uttar Pradesh

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Shridhar Venkatesh Ketkar

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Shridhar Venkatesh Ketkar

Shridhar Venkatesh Ketkar (2 February 1884 – 10 April 1937) was a sociologist, historian and novelist from Maharashtra, India. He is principally known as the chief editor of Maharashtriya Jnanakosha, the first ever encyclopaedia in the Marathi language. Early life and background Ketkar was born in the city of Raipur in Madhya Pradesh, and was educated in Amravati and Wilson College, Bombay. He left for the United States in 1906, and obtained his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1911. After a yearlong sojourn in London (circa 1912) where he met his future wife Edith Kohn, he returned to India. Career His first appointment in India was as a Professor of Economics, Science of Administration and Universal Jurisprudence at Calcutta University. In 1920, Ketkar (who was a Chitpavan Brahmin) married Edith Kohn (1886-1979), who joined him in Pune. Edith's name was changed to Sheelavati Ketkar after the wedding. Mrs Ketkar has written a memoir about Ketkar's peculiarities, their two adopted children and family lif

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Scholars from Chhattisgarh

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Presidents of the Akhil Bharatiya Marathi Sahit...

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Masud Husain Khan

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Masud Husain Khan

Masud Husain Khan (28 January 1919 – 16 October 2010) was a linguist, the first Professor Emeritus in Social Sciences at Aligarh Muslim University and the fifth Vice-Chancellor of Jamia Millia Islamia, a Central University in New Delhi. On 16 October 2010 Masud Husain Khan died in Aligarh from Parkinson's disease.[6] Family Masud Husain Khan was born in Qaimganj, district Farrukhabad, into a Afridi Pashtun family of Uttar Pradesh. His family is sometimes referred to as the Family of Vice-Chancellors, having provided Vice-Chancellors to four different universities across the Indian subcontinent. Masud Husain's father Muzaffar Husain Khan (1893–1921) completed his education from Islamia High School Etawah and Mohammadan Anglo Oriental (M.A.O.) College, Aligarh. He started his judicial career in Hyderabad but died of tuberculosis at the early age of twenty-eight. Masud Husain was just two years old when he lost his father. Muzaffar Husain Khan was eldest brother of[7]- Zakir Husain, the third President of

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Salim Khan

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Salim Khan

Salim Abdul Rashid Khan (born 24 November 1935), also known as Salim Khan, is an Indian film actor, producer and screenwriter. As a screenwriter, he wrote the screenplays, stories and scripts for numerous Bollywood films. In Hindi cinema, Khan is best known for being one half of the prolific screenwriting duo of Salim-Javed, along with Javed Akhtar. The duo Salim-Javed were the first Indian screenwriters to achieve star status,[1] becoming the most successful Indian screenwriters of all time,[2] and are regarded as "Hindi cinema's greatest screenwriters".[3] While working together, Salim Khan was largely responsible for developing the stories and characters, while Javed Akhtar was largely responsible for developing the dialogues.[4] Salim-Javed revolutionized Indian cinema in the 1970s,[5] transforming and reinventing the Bollywood formula, pioneering the Bollywood blockbuster format,[3] and pioneering genres such as the masala film[6] and the Dacoit Western.[7] Salim Khan was also responsible for creating t

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Vishnu Sakharam Khandekar

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Vishnu Sakharam Khandekar

Vishnu Sakharam Khandekar (11 January 1898 – 2 September 1976) was a Marathi writer from Maharashtra, India. He was the first Marathi author to win the prestigious Jnanpith Award.[1][2][3] Early life Khandekar was born on 19 January 1898 in Sangli, Maharashtra. His father was a munsif in Sangli principality. In his early life, he was interested in acting in movies and staged various dramas in his school days.[4] After passing his matriculation exam in 1913, Khandekar joined Fergusson College, Pune.[4] Professional and literary life In 1920, Khandekar started working as a school teacher in a small town, Shirode, in the present-day Sindhudurg district of the Konkan region in Maharashtra. He worked in that school until 1938. While working as a teacher, Khandekar produced in his spare time abundant Marathi literature in various forms. In his lifetime, he wrote sixteen novels, six plays, around 250 short stories, 50 allegorical stories, 100 essays, and over 200 critiques.[5] He worked and founded Khandekari a

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Manoj Khanderia

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Manoj Khanderia

Manoj Khanderia (July 6, 1943 – October 27, 2003) was an Indian poet and a Ghazal writer of Gujarati language. Life Manoj Khanderia (left) and Chinu Modi (right), U.S.A,1997 He was born on 6 July 1943 in Junagadh, Gujarat to Vrajlal and Vijyabahen. He studied at various schools in various towns of Gujarat including Dhoraji, Veraval, Junagadh, Morbi, Rajkot and Jamnagar because his father was a revenue officer who was transferred several times. He passed SSC from Junagadh in 1961. He completed his Bachelor of Science in 1965 from Bahauddin College, Junagadh with Chemistry and Botany and Bachelor of Law in 1967. He married Purnimaben and they had two daughters, Vani and Rucha, and a son, Abhijat.[1][2][3] He started his career as an advocate in 1968. He also served as a lecturer of Law from 1972 to 1984 and Commercial law from 1977 to 1981. He also worked as a lawyer from 1968. He started to write during 1959-60 under the guidance of professor Takhtasinh Parmar. In December 1965, his ghazal Divaalo (The w

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Kanwal Ziai

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Kanwal Ziai

Kanwal Ziai (Urdu: کنول ضیائی ‎), (born Hardayal Singh Datta) (15 March 1927 – 27 October 2011) was an Urdu and Hindi language poet and author from India.[1][2][3] Early life Ziai was born on 15 March 1927 in Kanjrur Dattan, Sialkot, (now Pakistan).[4] He received award Doon Ratan from Nagrik Parishad. He obtained Urdu Fazil certificate. He retired from Defence Department. He was also president of the Bazm-e-Jigar.[1] He died on 27 October 2011 in Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.[5][6] See also List of Indian poets List of Urdu language poets List of Urdu writers List of Urdu language writers Bibliography Pyase Jaam Urdu Poetry in Devnagri (Hindi) Language 1973[1] Lafzo Ki Diwar in Urdu Language 1993[1] Kagaz ka Dhua Dhoop ka Safar References Kartik Chandra Dutt (1999). "Who's Who of Indian Writers". Sahitya Akademi. p. 293. Retrieved 14 September 2012. astrosage. http://www.astrosage.com/celebrity-horoscope/about-kanwal-ziai-who-is-kanwal-ziai.asp, Retrieved 25 July 2014 biograph

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Sulaiman Khateeb

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Sulaiman Khateeb

Sulaiman Khateeb was an Urdu, Deccani poet. References http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-karnataka/sslc-toppers-to-be-feted/article125698.ece http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-andhrapradesh/mizahia-mushaira-sets-off-guffaws/article2829976.ece http://www.karnatakamuslims.com/portal/great-deccani-urdu-poet-sulaiman-khateeb-on-the-web/ External links Home page http://www.siasat.com/english/news/suleman-khateeb%E2%80%99s-dakhini-urdu-poetry-reforms-society-%E2%80%93-mr-zahid-ali-khan http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/Sulaiman-Khateeb http://www.siasat.com/english/news/sulaiman-khateeb-memorial-function http://www.caravanmagazine.in/arts/god-small-verse-dakhani-poetry-khateeb

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Indra Bahadur Khare

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Indra Bahadur Khare

Indra Bahadur Khare (16 December 1922 – 13 April 1953) was an Indian Hindi-language poet, a participant in Kavi-Sammelan, and a professor of 20th century Hindi literature. Personal life and education Born in the village of Gadarwara, Narsinghpur district in Madhya Pradesh, Khare developed a taste for literature at a very young age. He received his primary school education at Sohagpur, Itarasi and from Katni in Madhya Pradesh. He received his middle school education at Mahoba Uttar Pradesh and his secondary school education at Kishori Raman Vidyalay Mathura, Uttar Pradesh. He then entered the University of Allahabad where he studied for a BA, living at the Shyam Sundar Hostel. Because of financial constraints, he was unable to complete his education at the time. After working odd jobs in Jabalpur he attended Hitkarini City College there and completed his BA. In 1949 he joined the college as a professor. In 1946 he married Vidyawati Shrivastav, a school teacher who had an MA Degree in Sanskrit and M Ed. She

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Jayant Khatri

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Jayant Khatri

Jayant Heerji Khatri was a Gujarati short story author from India. Life Jayant Khatri was born to Heerji Hansraj Khatri and Jayaben on 24 September 1909 at Mundra, Kutch, Gujarat, India.[1] His father was a government doctor of Cutch State. He completed his primary education from Bhuj and secondary school education from New Bharda Highschool, Mumbai. He matriculated in 1928. He received L.C.P.S. from National Medical College, Mumbai in 1935 and started his medical practice. He later moved to Mandvi. He had close association with labors in Bhuj and Mumbai. He also served as a president of Navik Mandal, Mandvi (Seafarers Association) and later Mandvi Municipality.[2] He died on 6 June 1968 at Mandvi due to cancer.[2] Personal life He married Bachuben from Morjar village in 1929. After death of her first wife, he married his sister-in-law in 1935.[3] His son Kirti Khatri is an editor of Gujarati daily, Kutchmitra.[4] Works He was a progressive writer of his era.[5] Fora (1944), Vehta Zarna (1952) and Kh

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Laltluangliana Khiangte

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Laltluangliana Khiangte

Laltluangliana Khiangte is an Indian scholar, playwright and poet of Mizo literature.[1] He was the principal of the Serampore College and a former professor of the North Eastern Hill University.He is presently a Professor in the Department of Mizo at Mizoram University.[2] He is a recipient of the Pu Buanga Award, the highest literary award of the Mizo Academy of Letters.[3] The Government of India awarded him the fourth highest civilian honour of the Padma Shri, in 2006, for his contributions to Indian literature.[4] Biography Laltluangliana Khiangte was born in a Christian family to Tlanghmingthanga, a Church elder, and Darngeni Khawlhring, a schoolteacher, on 28 June 1961[1] in the northeast Indian state of Manipur and did his schooling locally during which time he was also involved with the Sunday School activities of the local church. He secured a master's degree in English literature (MA) from the North Eastern Hill University and continued his studies there to obtain a doctoral degree (PhD) in 1991.

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Jas Kohli

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Jas Kohli

Dr. Jas Kohli[2] is an Indian fictional author. His novel ‘Anything to Look Hot’ [3] was recently published by Shristi Publishers.[4] Early life and personal life Dr Jas Kohli was born in Ludhiana, Punjab, India to doctor parents. Presently, he is practising Laser cosmetic surgery at Elina Aesthetic and Laser Clinic[5] in Ludhiana. His wife is an anesthesiologist and they have a son and a daughter. Education He did his schooling in KVM School and later joined for M.B.B.S. course at Dayanand Medical College, Ludhiana. He did M. S. in surgery at the same institution. After working as a surgeon for five years, he did his super-specialisation (M. Ch.) in plastic surgery and joined Safdarjang Hospital at New Delhi. Later, he worked in hospitals at Michigan United States, Chandigarh and Ludhiana. Publications He has presented papers on plastic and cosmetic surgery at various conferences and his work has been published in national and international[6] journals. He received the ‘Best Paper Award’ at the annual

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Prakash Kona

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Prakash Kona

Prakash Kona Reddy (born 1967) is an Indian novelist, essayist, poet and theorist who lives in Hyderabad, India. He is currently Professor at the Department of English Literature, School of English Literary Studies, The English and Foreign Languages University (EFLU), Hyderabad. He writes in English, and is the author of the following books to date: How I Invented Myself as "Prakash Kona" [Poetry: 2008, Monsoon Editions, Calicut, India] Nunc Stans [Creative Non-fiction: 2009, CROSSING CHAOS enigmatic ink, Ontario, Canada] Words on Lips of a Stranger [2005, Writers Workshop, Calcutta] Pearls of an Unstrung Necklace [Fiction: 2005, Fugue State Press, New York] Literary Criticism: A Study of Pluralism (Wittgenstein, Chomsky and Derrida) [Theory: 2004, Wisdom House Publications, Leeds, England] Streets that Smell of Dying Roses [Fiction: 2003, Fugue State Press, New York; also Yeti Books, Calicut, India] Poems for Her (as Kona Prakash Reddy)* [Poetry: 1999, Writers Workshop, Calcutta] You and Ot

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Narendra Kohli

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Narendra Kohli

Dr. Narendra Kohli with wife Dr. Madhurima Kohli, his elder son Kartikeya, and grandsons, New Delhi (2008) Narendra Kohli (born 6 January 1940) is a Hindi-language author. He is credited with reinventing the ancient form of epic writing in modern prose.[1] He is also regarded as a trend-setter in the sense that he pioneered the creation of literary works based on the Puranas.[2] Because of the large impact of his body of work on Hindi literature, this era of contemporary modern Hindi literature, since about 1975, is sometimes referred to as the Kohli Era. Life Narendra Kohli was born to Parmananda Kohli and Vidyavanti in Punjab province of British India.[3] His first school was the Dev Samaj High School in Lahore. Then he attended the Ganda Singh High School in Sialkot for a few months. In 1947, after the partition of India, the family moved to Jamshedpur (Bihar). He resumed his schooling in third grade at Dhatkidih Lower Primary school. He spent fourth to seventh grade (1949–53) at New Middle English scho

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T. V. Kochubava

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T. V. Kochubava

T. V. Kochubava (1955–1999) was an Indian writer of Malayalam literature, known for his novels and short stories. He published twenty three books covering the genres of novels, short stories, translations and plays and was a recipient of a number of awards including the Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award for Novel in 1996, besides several other honours. Biography Kochubava was born on November 28, 1955 at Kattoor village in Thrissur district of the south Indian state of Kerala to Veeravu, a coir merchant and his wife, Beevathu, in a family with limited financial resources.[1] After early schooling at St. George's Convent UP School, Karanchira and Pompei St. Mary's High Secondary School, Kattoor, he graduated from Sree Narayana College, Nattika before moving to Sharjah to work at a private company for the next two decades.[2] On his return to India, he joined Gulf Voice as its editor and settled in Kozhikode.[1] Kochubava was married to Zeenath and the couple had a son and a daughter.[3] He died on November 25, 1

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Kozhikodan

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Kozhikodan

K. Appukuttan Nair (1925–2007), better known as Kozhikodan, was a film critic and writer from Kerala, India. One of the first critics to take a closer look at the mainstream Malayalam cinema, he reviewed about 2,000 Malayalam films over four decades. He began writing on films from the early 1950s. He started writing in Mathrubhumi and Chandrika, and later became a regular columnist of Mathrubhumi Illustrated Weekly along with Cynic and Nadirsha (TMP Nedungadi). The trio is said to have elevated film criticism into a serious genre of writing in Malayalam. Kozhikodan received the Kerala State Film Award for Best Book on Cinema in 1988 for Chalathitraswadanam Engane? and the Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award (Humour) in 2010 for the poetry collection Padachonikku Salam. He died on 20 January 2007.[1] 'Kozhikodan Smaraka Samiti' has instituted Kozhikodan Puraskaram, an award given annually to the best book on cinema in Malayalam.[2] Works Cinema Chalachitra Sallapam (DC Books, 1982) Chalachitra Niroopanam (NBS,

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Kottarathil Sankunni

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Kottarathil Sankunni

Kottarathil Sankunni (born Vasudevan, 1855–1937) was an Indian writer of Malayalam literature. Best known as the author of Aithihyamala, an eight-volume compilation of century-old legends about Kerala,[1] Sankunni's writings cover prose and poetry, including verses for Kathakali and Ottan Thullal. He was one of the founding members of Bhashaposhini Sabha founded by Kandathil Varghese Mappillai and was also involved with Bharata Vilasam Sabha, another literary initiative. He died on July 22, 1937. Biography Kottarathil Sankunni was born on March 23, 1855 at Kodimatha, in Kottayam district of the south Indian state of Kerala (erstwhile Travancore) to Vasudevan Unni-Nangayya couple.[2] The boy, whose name at birth was Vasudevan but was called Thanku, Sanku and later Sankunni, did his early schooling under the tutelage of a local teacher and later, studied Sanskrit under Manarkattu Sanku Warrier and traditional medicine under Vayskara Aryan Narayanan Mooss. He joined Malayala Manorama in 1890 as the editor of t

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Rajendra Krishan

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Rajendra Krishan

Rajendra Krishan Duggal (6 June 1919 – 23 September 1987) also credited as Rajinder Krishan, was an Indian poet, lyricist and screenwriter.[2] Biography Rajendra Krishan was born in a Duggal family at Jalalpur Jattan on 6 June 1919, in Gujrat District (in present-day Pakistan).[3] Even when he was studying in the eighth class he was attracted towards poetry. In his early work life he had a clerk's job in the municipal office in Simla, where he toiled up to 1942. During that period, he read eastern and western authors extensively and wrote poetry. He expresses his indebtedness to the Urdu poetry of Firaq Gorakhpuri and Ahsan Danish, as well as to the Hindi poems of Pant and Nirala.In those days the newspapers in the Delhi-Punjab brought out special supplements and held poetry contests to mark Krishna Janmashtami, in which he participated regularly. In the mid-1940s, Krishan shifted to Bombay (now Mumbai) to become a screenwriter in the Hindi film industry. His first screenplay was Janta (1947). His first fi

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Mundur Krishnankutty

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Mundur Krishnankutty

Anupurath Krishnankutty, popularly known as Mundur Krishnankutty (17 July 1935 – 4 June 2005), was a Malayalam–language writer from Kerala state, India. He was born in Mundur in Palghat to parents Manakulangara Govinda Pisharody and Anupurath Madhavi Pisharasyar. He completed schooling from Parali High School and mastered in English literature from Government Victoria College, Palakkad. He obtained a B.Ed degree from NSS College, Ottapalam and worked as a teacher in Palakkad VVP High School, Palakkad PMG High School and Chittoor Training School. He wrote his first short story "Kannalichekkan" (Cow boy) in 1956 which was published in Navayugam. The same year another story titled "Ambalavasikal" (Temple workers) was published in the Mathrubhumi Illustrated Weekly. He had written more than 200 short stories and three novels. His stories are renowned for their realistic portrayal of life in Palakkad villages, focusing on the transformational crisis of an agrarian society. He won many awards including the Odakkuz

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Subramanian Krishnamoorthy

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Subramanian Krishnamoorthy

S. Krishnamoorthy or S. Krishnamurthy (Subramanian Krishnamoorthy, 1929 - 7 September 2014)[1] has been writing short stories and articles in English and Tamil for over four decades. He was also the winner of prestigious Sahitya Akademi prize for translation. Life He was born on 1929 in Pudukkotttai, Tamil Nadu. He obtained his B.A degree from "H.H. The Raja’s college", Pudukkottai,(under University of Madras) securing the first rank in the university in Sanskrit. He then obtained his M.A degree in English literature from Nagpur University.His mother-tongue is Tamil. He also knows Hindi, Bengali,English,Sanskrit,and German.He taught at a college for a few years.Then he joined the audit department of the Government of India at Madras in 1954.In 1955 he was transferred to Kolkata, where he has been living ever since, except for a 3-year spell in Delhi.He retired from the Indian Audits and Accounts Service in 1987.. He died in Chennai on 7 September 2014 due to illness. Literary contributions He has written

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Hunsur Krishnamurthy

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Hunsur Krishnamurthy

Hunsur Krishnamurthy (9 February 1914 – 13 February 1989)[1] was an Indian playwright, film director, producer, actor, screenwriter and lyricist in Kannada cinema. He worked with noted theatre personalities early in his career; Gubbi Veeranna, Mohammed Peer and B. R. Panthulu before entering films. As a film director, he made films mostly in the mythological genre such as Satya Harishchandra (1965), Bhakta Kumbara (1974) and Babruvahana (1977), all of which star Rajkumar in the lead roles. The films were major critical and commercial successes and are seen as milestones in Kannada cinema and in the career of Rajkumar.[2] Early life Krishnamurthy was born on 9 February 1914 in Hunsur, in the erstwhile Kingdom of Mysore of British India, to M. Rajarao, who worked in the Public Works Department, and Padmavati. He attended school in Hunsur, and completed his high school education from Sharada Vilas High School and Basayya School, Mysore.[1] Career Theatre Prior to working in films, Krishnamurthy worked in th

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Kalki Krishnamurthy

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Kalki Krishnamurthy

Ramaswamy Aiyer Krishnamurthy (9 September 1899 – 5 December 1954), better known by his pen name Kalki, was an Indian writer, journalist, poet, critic and Indian independence activist. He was named after "Kalki", the tenth and last avatar of the Hindu God Vishnu.[1] His writings include over 120 short stories, 10 novellas, 5 novels, 3 historical romances, editorial and political writings and hundreds of film and music reviews. Early life Krishnamurthy's father was Ramaswamy Aiyar, a poor accountant in Puttamangalam village in the old Tanjore district of erstwhile Madras Presidency. He began his primary education in his village school and later attended Municipal High School in Mayavaram but quit in 1921, just short of completion of his Senior School Leaving Certificate, in response to Mahatma Gandhi's 1921 call for non-co-operation joining the Indian National Congress instead.[2][3] Bibliography Historical novels Serial Name Comments 1 Parthiban Kanavu (1941–1943)[4] About Pallava Dynasty 2 Siv

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Nayani Krishnakumari

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Nayani Krishnakumari

Nayani Krishnakumari (14 March 1930 – 29 January 2016) was an Indian scholar, poet, researcher, speaker in Telugu and an active participant in literary and cultural organizations. She served several institutions in various capacities. She received several awards such as Swarnakankanam, instituted by Desoddharaka Kasinathuni Nageswara Rao, Best Telugu Writer award from Potti Sreeramulu Telugu University, and Sahitya Akademi among others. Life Krishnakumari was born to Nayani Subba Rao and Hanumayamma in Guntur, a town in Andhra Pradesh, India. She was married to Canakapalli Madhusudana Rao, a lawyer and a distant relative, in 1954. They have one daughter and two sons. Krishnakumari has been an active participant in literary and cultural events. She worked on Telugu ballads and obtained her doctorate in 1970. She had a master's degree in Sanskrit. In her dissertation, Krishnakumari took the western critiquing tools and explained the narrative style in Telugu ballads and correlated their underlying philosoph

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Kunwar Viyogi (poet)

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Kunwar Viyogi (poet)

Kunwar Viyogi (4 September 1940 – 2015) christened as Group Captain Randhir Singh Jamwal is the first and only Indian Air Force officer to have received the prestigious Sahitya Akademi Award for his long Dogri poem titled 'Ghar'[1] in 1980. He used 'Ghar' (Home) as a peg and stringed together 238 four lines verses embracing a wide variety of subjects and ideas and feelings into a long poem. He is also the youngest poet in the history of Sahitya Akademi to have been bestowed with such an honour. Early life Kunwar Viyogi was born on 4 September 1940 in the Samba district to Poorakh Singh Jamwal, who served as an Inspector in the J&K Police Department.[2] His mother, Pushpa Devi was a home maker, and mother to 5 brothers and three sisters. Kunwar Viyogi was the eldest of them all. Most of Kunwar Viyogi's siblings served the country by either joining the Army or the Air Force. All his sisters were married to defence officers. Kunwar Viyogi's childhood was not tied to one place owing to his father's occupat

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Punathil Kunjabdulla

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Punathil Kunjabdulla

Punathil Kunjabdulla (3 April 1940 – 27 October 2017) was an Indian writer from Kerala. A medical doctor by profession, Kunjabdulla was a practitioner of the avant-garde in Malayalam literature.[1][2] His work includes more than 45 books, including 7 novels, 15 short story collections, memoirs, an autobiography and travelogues. His work Smarakasilakal (Memorial Stones) won the Central and State Akademi Awards.[3] Early and personal life Kunjabdulla was born in 1940 in Karakkad near Onchiyam in Vatakara, Malabar District (present-day Kozhikode district, Kerala) as the son of C. K. Mammu and Saina, Kunjabdulla. He completed his primary education from Karakkad Mappila Lower Primary School and high school from Govt. Fisheries Technical School, Madappally. He joined Government Brennen College, Thalassery and completed his pre-degree and a bachelor's degree in science.[4] He wanted to continue his studies at Brennen College and to do his masters in Malayalam. He was dissuaded by the late critic M. N. Vijayan, who

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Madampu Kunjukuttan

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Madampu Kunjukuttan

Madampu Sankaran Namboothiri, popularly known as Madampu Kunjukuttan, is a Malayalam author and a screenplay writer.[1] He is one of the most prolific and versatile writers in modern Malayalam literature. His novels, short stories and screenplays speaks more about the Kerala society. He has won the National Film Award for Best Screenplay in the year 2000 for the Malayalam film Karunam, directed by Jayaraj.[2] In 2003, he won the Ashdod International Film Award for Best Screenplay for the film Parinamam (The Change) directed by P.Venu.[3][4] He received Sanjayan Award in 2014.[5] Background and personal life He was born in Kiralur village Thrissur District on 23 June 1941. He studied Sanskrit, Hasthyaayurvedam (treatment of elephants), worked as teacher for Sanskrit at Kodungalloor and was also a priest in a nearby temple. Madampu also worked for Ākāsha Vāṇī (All India Radio). He was married to late Savithri Antharjanam and he has two daughters, Jaseena Madampu and Haseena Madampu. Filmography Utyopyile

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Best Original Screenplay National Film Award wi...

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G. A. Kulkarni

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G. A. Kulkarni

G. A. Kulkarni (Gurunath Abaji Kulkarni) or simply "GA" ( 10 July 1923 - 11 December 1987 ) (Marathi: जी. ए. कुलकर्णी, "जीए"), was a legendary Sahitya Akademi Award winner[1] Marathi writer of short stories. Kulkarni grew up in Belgaum. After earning his master's degree, he taught English at JSS College in Dharwad for about 30 years.[2] He had very strong liking for Dharwad and Belgaum. For medical treatment of his eyes, he reluctantly moved to Pune in 1985. A major road[3] in the Kothrud area of Pune, where Kulkarni lived for couple of years before his death, has been named after him. Kulkarni, who bought new strength and vitality to the Marathi short story, is admittedly the most distinguished exponent of that genre. A contemporary of Gangadhar Gadgil, Arvind Gokhale and Vyankatesh Madgulkar, he did not subscribe to the cause of modernism in literature. He charted his own separate course and cultivated new acuity and taste for a class of faithful readers.[4] Kulkarni created a world of his own in his sho

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O. N. V. Kurup

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O. N. V. Kurup

Ottaplakkal Neelakandan Velu Kurup (27 May 1931 – 13 February 2016), popularly known as O. N. V. Kurup or simply and endearingly O. N. V., was a Malayalam poet and lyricist from Kerala, India, who won the Jnanpith Award, the highest literary award in India for the year 2007. He received the awards Padma Shri in 1998 and Padma Vibhushan in 2011, the fourth and second highest civilian honours from the Government of India. In 2007 he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by University of Kerala, Trivandrum. O. N. V. was known for his leftist leaning. He was a leader of All India Students Federation (AISF).[1] He died on 13 February 2016 at KIMS hospital in Thiruvananthapuram due to age-related illnesses, aged 84.[2] Biography O.N.V Kurup was born to O. N. Krishna Kurup and K. Lakshmikutty Amma, on 27 May 1931 at Chavara, Kollam (Quilon) in Kerala.[3][4] He lost his father when he was eight. His childhood days were spent in Chavara where he attended the government school. After graduating with a bachelor's degree

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Sreekrishnapuram Krishnankutty

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Sreekrishnapuram Krishnankutty

Sreekrishnapuram Krishnankutty is a Malayalam short story writer[1] born on 15 June 1947. He was born in a village called Sreekrishnapuram near Cherpulassery in Palakkad District of Kerala State, South India. He has won National Award for best teacher in 2001. Professional career Sreekrishnapuram Krishnankutty completed his schooling from Sreekrishnapuram HSS and completed TTC from Anakkara. After that he has done BA and MA in Malayalam Literature followed by B.Ed. from Calicut University. He started his career as a teacher for lower primary students and then moved to Moyan Girls High school, Palakkad.He retired from Govt. Higher Secondary School Alanallur in 2001.Currently he is working as the Principal of Mannampatta TTI. Major works Karnnan (Novel) Oru Verum Sakshi Mathram Nilavilipole Kannadiyil Kanathathu Daivathinte Komali Thavalam Manassilekkoru Palam (In Press) Awards and recognitions National Award for Best Teacher 2001 M.S. Rudran Foundation Award 2007 References http://sites.g

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U. K. Kumaran

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U. K. Kumaran

U. K. Kumaran (Malayalam: യു.കെ. കുമാരന്‍; born 11 May 1950) is a Malayalam-language novelist, short story writer, essayist and journalist from Kerala, India. He is a recipient of the Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award and Vayalar Award.[1] Biography Kumaran was born in Payyoli, Kozhikode on 11 May 1950. He studied at Government AUP School, Kizhoor and Government High School, Payyoli. He obtained a degree in economics from Guruvayurappan College, Kozhikode and a diploma in Journalism and Public Relations. He started his career as a journalist, in Veekshanam Vaarika as Assistant Editor. Later he joined Kerala Kaumudi and worked as its Kozhikode unit chief. He has held numerous posts including the State Vice-President of Kerala Pathrapravarthaka Union, Member of Kerala State Telephone Advisory Committee, Member of Calicut University Journalism Board of Studies, Vice-Chairman of Kerala Sahitya Akademi, Advisory committee member of National Book Trust and the director of Navakerala Co-operative Publishing House. He

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Dushyant Kumar

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Dushyant Kumar

Dushyant Kumar (1 September 1933 – 30 December 1975) was a poet of modern Hindi literature. He is famous for writing Hindi Ghazals, and is generally recognised as one of the foremost Hindi poets of the 20th century.[1] Personal life Dushyant Kumar was married to Rajeshwari Tyagi.[2] Death and legacy Parts of Dushyant Kumar's poem ""Ho Gayi hai Peer Parvat Si"(हो गई है पीर पर्वत-सी)" were used in the popular 2017 India film Irada. The film showcases the sorry state of the people of Bhatinda (Punjab) due to corruption, and cancer caused by pesticides left from the Green revolution and uranium contamination of ground water due to fly ash from thermal power plants.[3] The poem "Ho Gayi hai Peer Parvat Si"(हो गई है पीर पर्वत-सी) was sung often by Arvind Kejriwal during the Anti Corruption Movement (2011–2012) in India.[4][5] Lines Dushyant Kumar from his Ghazal 'Saye Me Dhoop' are often used in many programmes, and the Hindi film "Halla Bol" मेरे सीने में नहीं तो तेरे सीने मे सही, हो कहीं भी आग, लेकिन आग

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