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Super Bowl-winning head coaches


Bill Belichick

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Bill Belichick

William Stephen Belichick ( or ; born April 16, 1952) is an American football coach who serves as the head coach of the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He exercises extensive authority over the Patriots' football operations, effectively making him the team's general manager as well.[1] He holds numerous coaching records, including winning a record six Super Bowls as the head coach of the New England Patriots, and two more as defensive coordinator for the New York Giants.[2] He is widely considered to be one of the greatest coaches in NFL history by current and former players, his peers, and the press.[3] Belichick began his coaching career in 1975 and became the defensive coordinator for New York Giants head coach Bill Parcells by 1985. Parcells and Belichick won two Super Bowls together before Belichick left to become the head coach of the Cleveland Browns in 1991. He remained in Cleveland for five seasons but was fired following the team's 1995 season. He then rejoined Parcells,

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Pete Carroll

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Pete Carroll

Peter Clay Carroll (born September 15, 1951) is an American football coach who is the head coach and executive vice president of the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL). He is a former head coach of the New York Jets, New England Patriots, and the USC Trojans of the University of Southern California (USC). Carroll is one of only three football coaches who have won both a Super Bowl (with Seattle) and a college football national championship (with USC).[2] One of Carroll's greatest accomplishments was masterminding the Seahawks' defense known as the Legion of Boom who led the NFL in scoring defense four years straight becoming the first team to do so since the 1950s Cleveland Browns.[3] Early life Carroll was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Rita (née Ban) and James Edward "Jim" Carroll. Two of his paternal great-grandparents were Irish immigrants, and his Croatian maternal grandparents emigrated from around the region of Šibenik.[4] Carroll attended Redwood High School in Lar

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Tom Coughlin

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Tom Coughlin

Thomas Richard Coughlin (born August 31, 1946) is an American football coach and executive. He was the head coach for the New York Giants for 12 seasons. He led the Giants to victory in Super Bowl XLII and Super Bowl XLVI, both times against the New England Patriots. Coughlin was also the inaugural head coach of the Jaguars, serving from 1995 to 2002 and leading the team to two AFC Championship Games. Prior to his head coaching career in the NFL, he was head coach of the Boston College Eagles football team from 1991 to 1993, and served in a variety of coaching positions in the NFL as well as coaching and administrative positions in college football. Early life Coughlin was born in Waterloo, NY in 1946, and played football and basketball in high school. He once played a high school basketball game against Jim Boeheim, who played for Lyons High School at the time. He idolized Ernie Davis and wished to play at Syracuse.[1] College Coughlin attended Syracuse University when he was offered a scholarship by ass

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Brian Billick

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Brian Billick

Brian Harold Billick[1] (born February 28, 1954) is an American former football coach and commentator. Billick spent nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL) as head coach of the Baltimore Ravens from January 19, 1999 to December 31, 2007; he led the Ravens to a 34–7 victory over the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXXV, the franchise's first Super Bowl appearance. He was also the offensive coordinator for the Minnesota Vikings (1994–1998) when they broke the scoring record in the 1998 season. Playing career Billick, who played football and basketball at Redlands High School in Redlands, California, had his #17 jersey retired by the school in March 2001.[2] He played both quarterback and cornerback and holds the state record with 21 career interceptions. After spending his freshman season as a linebacker at the United States Air Force Academy,[3] Billick transferred to Brigham Young University[4] and became a tight end. He later told friends that he left the Air Force Academy because he learned, af

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Mike Ditka

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Mike Ditka

Michael Keller Ditka (born Michael Dyczko; October 18, 1939) is an American former football player, coach, and television commentator. A member of both the College Football (1986) and Pro Football Hall of Fame (1988), he was the 1961 UPI NFL Rookie of Year, a five-time Pro Bowl selection and five-time All-Pro tight end with the Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles, and Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was an NFL champion with the 1963 Bears, and is a three-time Super Bowl champion, playing on the Cowboys Super Bowl VI team as well as winning as an assistant coach for the Cowboys in Super Bowl XII, and coaching the Bears to victory in Super Bowl XX. He was named to the NFL's 50th, 75th and 100th Anniversary All-Time Teams. As a coach for the Bears for 11 years he was twice both the AP and UPI NFL Coach of Year (1985 and 1988). He also coached the New Orleans Saints for three years. Ditka and Tom Flores are the only people to win an NFL title as a player, an assistant coach, and a head

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Weeb Ewbank

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Weeb Ewbank

Wilbur Charles "Weeb" Ewbank (May 6, 1907 – November 17, 1998) was an American professional football coach. He led the Baltimore Colts to NFL championships in 1958 and 1959 and the New York Jets to victory in Super Bowl III in 1969. He is the only coach to win a championship in both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL). Ewbank grew up in Indiana and attended Miami University in Ohio, where he was a multi-sport star who led his baseball, basketball and football teams to state championships. He immediately began a coaching career after graduating, working at Ohio high schools between 1928 and 1943, when he entered the U.S. Navy during World War II. While in the military, Ewbank was an assistant to Paul Brown on a service football team at Naval Station Great Lakes outside of Chicago. Ewbank was discharged in 1945 and coached college sports for three years before reuniting with Brown as an assistant with the Cleveland Browns, a professional team in the All-America Football Confer

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Tony Dungy

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Tony Dungy

Anthony Kevin Dungy ( DUN-jee; born October 6, 1955) is a former professional American football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL). Dungy was head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 1996 to 2001, and head coach of the Indianapolis Colts from 2002 to 2008. Dungy became the first black head coach to win the Super Bowl when his Colts defeated the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.[1] Dungy set a new NFL record for consecutive playoff appearances by a head coach in 2008 after securing his tenth straight playoff appearance with a win against the Jacksonville Jaguars.[2][3] Dungy announced his retirement as coach of the Indianapolis Colts on January 12, 2009 following the Colts' loss in the playoffs.[4] The Colts qualified for the playoffs in every season they were coached by Dungy. Since retirement, Dungy has served as an analyst on NBC's Football Night in America. He is also the national spokesman for the fatherhood program All Pro Dad.[5] Dungy was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fam

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Bill Cowher

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Bill Cowher

William Laird Cowher (born May 8, 1957) is a former professional American football coach and player in the National Football League (NFL). In 2020, he was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, along with fellow coach-turned-TV analyst Jimmy Johnson. In Cowher's 15 seasons as head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, the team won eight division titles and made 10 playoff appearances. Cowher led the Steelers to the Super Bowl twice, winning one. He is the second coach in NFL history to reach the playoffs in each of his first six seasons as head coach, a feat previously accomplished only by Paul Brown. Cowher retired as head coach of the Steelers on January 5, 2007, 11 months after winning Super Bowl XL in 2006 over the Seattle Seahawks. Cowher was replaced by current Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin. Before being hired by the Steelers in 1992, Cowher served as an assistant coach for the Cleveland Browns and Kansas City Chiefs under head coach Marty Schottenheimer. He is currently a studio analyst for The NFL

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Jon Gruden

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Jon Gruden

Jon David Gruden (born August 17, 1963) is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He first served as the Raiders' head coach from 1998 to 2001 and rejoined the team in 2018. In between his tenure with the Raiders, he was the head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 2002 to 2008, where he led the team to the franchise's first Super Bowl title in XXXVII. At the time, Gruden, aged 39 years, 5 months and 9 days, was the youngest head coach to win a Super Bowl. Gruden also served as an analyst for ESPN and Monday Night Football before he returned to coaching. Early life Gruden was born on August 17, 1963, in Sandusky, Ohio, and is of Slovene descent.[1] His father, Jim, later served as a professional football regional scout, quarter backs coach, and director of player personnel for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[2] His brother, Jay, played and coached in the Arena Football League, and was most recently the head coach of the Washington Redskins

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Tom Flores

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Tom Flores

Thomas Raymond Flores (born March 21, 1937) is an American former professional football coach and player. He and Mike Ditka are the only two people in National Football League history to win a Super Bowl as a player, assistant coach, and head coach (Super Bowl IV as a player for the Chiefs, Super Bowl XI as an assistant coach of the Raiders, and Super Bowl XV and Super Bowl XVIII as head coach of the Raiders). Flores was also the first Hispanic starting quarterback and the first minority head coach in professional football history to win a Super Bowl.[1] From 1997 until 2018, Flores served as radio announcer for the Raiders Radio Network.[2] Playing career Flores played quarterback for two seasons at Fresno City College, beginning in 1955. He was active off the field too, serving on the Student Council and as President of the Associated Men's Students. He received an academic scholarship to study at the College (now University) of the Pacific. Flores graduated from the University of the Pacific in 1958, b

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John Harbaugh

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John Harbaugh

John W. Harbaugh (born September 23, 1962) is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL).[1] Previously, he coached the defensive backs for the Philadelphia Eagles[2] and served as the Eagles special teams coach for nine years. Harbaugh and his younger brother, former San Francisco 49ers and now University of Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh, are the first pair of brothers in NFL history to serve as head coaches. Jack Harbaugh, Jim and John's father, served 45 years as a college defensive coach, an assistant coach, and a running backs coach.[3] John and the Ravens beat his brother, Jim, and the 49ers at Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans on February 3, 2013 by a score of 34–31. Harbaugh has led the Ravens to 128 wins (including playoffs) since his tenure began in 2008, the fourth-most wins in the NFL over that span, and has surpassed Brian Billick for the most wins by a head coach in Baltimore Ravens franchise history. In his twelve-year tenure

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Joe Gibbs

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Joe Gibbs

Joe Jackson Gibbs (born November 25, 1940) is an American former professional football coach who became a race car team owner in NASCAR Cup Series, NASCAR Xfinity Series, and National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). In football, he was the 20th and 26th head coach in the history of the Washington Redskins (1981–1992, 2004–2007) in the National Football League (NFL). Known for his work ethic, Gibbs constructed what Steve Sabol has called, "The most diverse dynasty in NFL history", building championship teams from players who had mediocre to average performance while playing for other NFL teams. During his first stint in the NFL, he led the Redskins to eight playoff appearances, four NFC Championship titles, and three Super Bowl titles over 12 seasons. Gibbs is the only head coach to have won Super Bowls with three different starting quarterbacks. After retiring at the end of the 1992 season, he switched focus to NASCAR team Joe Gibbs Racing, which has won five NASCAR Cup Series championships under his ownership.

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Mike Holmgren

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Mike Holmgren

Michael George Holmgren (born June 15, 1948) is a former American football coach and executive. He began his NFL career as a quarterbacks' coach and later as an offensive coordinator with the San Francisco 49ers, where they won Super Bowls XXIII and XXIV. He served as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 1992 to 1998, where he won Super Bowl XXXI, and of the Seattle Seahawks from 1999 to 2008. His last role in the NFL was as team president of the Cleveland Browns from 2010 to 2012. Prior to his career in the NFL, Holmgren coached football at the high school and collegiate levels. Holmgren is noted for his role in molding quarterbacks such as Steve Young, Brett Favre, and Matt Hasselbeck during his tenures in San Francisco, Green Bay, and Seattle, respectively. Joe Montana won his two MVP awards under the direction of Holmgren in 1989 and 1990. Under Holmgren's leadership and play-calling the Green Bay Packers were consistent winners and never had a losing season. He was considered one of the best co

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Gary Kubiak

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Gary Kubiak

Gary Wayne Kubiak (born August 15, 1961) is an American football coach and former player who is currently assistant head coach and offensive advisor for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL).[1] He served as head coach for the NFL's Houston Texans from 2006 to 2013 and of the Denver Broncos in 2015 and 2016 before stepping down from the position on January 1, 2017, citing health reasons.[2] Earlier in his coaching career, he served as an assistant coach for the Broncos, Texas A&M University and San Francisco 49ers. He was also the offensive coordinator for the Baltimore Ravens in 2014. Kubiak played quarterback in college at Texas A&M. He was drafted in the eighth round of the 1983 NFL Draft as the 197th overall pick by the Broncos where he played from 1983 to 1991 as the backup to John Elway. Kubiak has participated in seven Super Bowls, losing three as a player with the Broncos, winning three as an assistant coach with the Broncos and the 49ers and winning Super Bowl 50 as

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Jimmy Johnson (American football coach)

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Jimmy Johnson (American football coach)

James William Johnson (born July 16, 1943) is an American football broadcaster and former player, coach, and executive. He served as the head football coach at Oklahoma State University–Stillwater from 1979 to 1983 and the University of Miami from 1984 to 1988. Johnson then moved to the National Football League (NFL), serving as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys from 1989 to 1993, winning two Super Bowls with the team, and finally serving as head coach of the Miami Dolphins from 1996 to 1999. As of 2016, he is an analyst for Fox NFL Sunday, the Fox network's NFL pregame show for the NFL games. On January 12, 2020, it was announced that he would be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[1] Johnson and fellow coach-turned-analyst Bill Cowher are the only two coaches to be inducted for what is called the "Centennial Class", commemorating the NFL's 100th anniversary. Johnson was the first of three football coaches to lead teams to both a major college football championship and a Super Bowl victory, the othe

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Tom Landry

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Tom Landry

Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American professional football player and coach. He was the first head coach of the Dallas Cowboys in the National Football League (NFL), a position he held for 29 seasons. During his coaching career, he created many new formations and methods, such as the now popular 4–3 defense, and the "flex defense" system made famous by the Doomsday Defense squads he built during his tenure with the Cowboys. His 29 consecutive years from 1960 to 1988 as the coach of one team is an NFL record,[1] along with his 20 consecutive winning seasons, which is considered to be his most impressive professional accomplishment. In addition to his record 20 consecutive winning seasons from 1966 to 1985, Landry won two Super Bowl titles in VI and XII[2], five NFC titles, and 13 Divisional titles. He compiled a 270–178–6 record, the fourth-most wins all-time for an NFL coach, and his 20 career playoff victories are the second most of any coach in NFL history. Landry was

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Vince Lombardi

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Vince Lombardi

Vincent Thomas Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was an American football player, coach, and executive in the National Football League (NFL). He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight and five total NFL Championships in seven years, in addition to winning the first two Super Bowls at the conclusion of the 1966 and 1967 NFL seasons. Lombardi began his coaching career as an assistant and later as a head coach at St. Cecilia High School in Englewood, New Jersey. He was an assistant coach at Fordham, at the United States Military Academy, and with the New York Giants before becoming a head coach for the Green Bay Packers from 1959 to 1967 and the Washington Redskins in 1969. He never had a losing season as a head coach in the NFL, compiling a regular season winning percentage of 72.8% (96–34–6), and 90% (9–1) in the postseason for an overall record of 105 wins, 35 losses, and 6 ties in the NFL.[1] Although Lombardi was noted

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Bill Parcells

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Bill Parcells

Duane Charles "Bill" Parcells (born August 22, 1941),[1] also known as "The Big Tuna",[2] is a former American football coach who was a head coach in the National Football League (NFL) for 19 seasons. He rose to prominence as the head coach of the New York Giants, whom he led to two Super Bowl titles. Parcells later served as the head coach of the New England Patriots, New York Jets, and Dallas Cowboys. Throughout his career, he coached teams that were in a period of decline and turned them into postseason contenders. He is the only coach in NFL history to lead four teams to the playoffs and three teams to a conference championship game. When Parcells became the head coach of the Giants in 1983, he took over a franchise that had qualified for the postseason only once (1981) in the past decade and had only one winning record in their last 10 seasons. Parcells brought new success to the team and within four years, guided them to their first Super Bowl win. His tenure with the Giants spanned eight seasons and c

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Don McCafferty

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Don McCafferty

Donald William McCafferty (March 12, 1921 – July 28, 1974) was an American football player and coach who, in his first year as head coach of the Baltimore Colts, led the team to a victory in Super Bowl V, and became the first rookie head coach to win the Super Bowl.[1] College career McCafferty played college football for Ohio State University under coach Paul Brown, where he was a key member of the offensive line. Due to World War II, he was one of a select group of players to play twice in the annual College All-Star Game held in Chicago. Professional career After moving on to the National Football League (NFL), McCafferty was shifted to wide receiver, playing one season with the New York Giants in 1946. Coaching career After working in the Cleveland, Ohio, recreation department the following year, he was hired as an assistant at Kent State University in 1948. He spent eleven seasons with the Golden Flashes until accepting an assistant coaching position with the Baltimore Colts in 1959 under head coac

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John Madden

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John Madden

John Earl Madden (born April 10, 1936) is an American former football coach and sportscaster. He won a Super Bowl as head coach of the Oakland Raiders, and after retiring from coaching became a well-known color commentator for NFL telecasts. In 2006, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in recognition of his coaching career. He is also widely known for the long-running Madden NFL video game series he has endorsed and fronted since 1988. Madden worked as a color analyst for all four major networks: CBS (1979–1993), Fox (1994–2001), ABC (2002–2005), and NBC (2006–2008). Madden retired from broadcasting after the 2008 NFL season to spend more time with his family.[1] He has also written several books and has served as a commercial pitchman for various products and retailers. Early life John Madden was born in Austin, Minnesota to Earl Russell Madden and Mary Margaret (née Flaherty) Madden. His father, an auto mechanic, moved the Madden family to Daly City, California, a town just south of San Fra

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Mike McCarthy (American football)

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Mike McCarthy (American football)

Michael John McCarthy (born November 10, 1963) is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He is also the former head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 2006 to 2018, leading them to a win in Super Bowl XLV over his hometown team, the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was previously the offensive coordinator for the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints. Early life and playing career McCarthy was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His father was a firefighter and Pittsburgh Police officer as well as a bar owner, who raised McCarthy as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan.[1][2] McCarthy was a tight end at Scottsdale Community College[3] before transferring to Baker University, an NAIA school located in Baldwin City, Kansas.[4] Coaching career College After serving as a graduate assistant at Fort Hays State from 1987 to 1988, McCarthy returned home to Pittsburgh and was hired in 1989 to work under Mike Gottfried and then later Paul Hackett at

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Chuck Noll

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Chuck Noll

Charles Henry Noll (January 5, 1932 – June 13, 2014) was an American professional football player and head coach. Regarded as one of the greatest head coaches of all time, his sole head coaching position was for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL) from 1969 to 1991. When Noll retired after 23 years, only three other head coaches in NFL history had longer tenures with one team.[1] After a seven-year playing career that included two NFL Championships as a member of his hometown Cleveland Browns and several years as an assistant coach with various teams, in 1969 Noll took the helm of the then moribund Steelers (which had played in only one post-season game in its previous 36 years, a 21–0 loss), and turned it into a perennial contender. As a head coach, Noll won four Super Bowls, four AFC titles and nine Central Division championships, compiled a 209–156–1 (.572) overall record, a 16–8 playoff record and had winning records in 15 of his final 20 seasons.[2] His four Super Bowl victorie

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Sean Payton

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Sean Payton

Patrick Sean Payton (born December 29, 1963) is an American football coach and former player who is the current head coach of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). Payton was a quarterback at Naperville Central High School and Eastern Illinois University and played professionally in 1987 and 1988. He began his coaching career as offensive assistant for San Diego State University and had several assistant coaching positions on college and NFL teams before being named as the tenth full-time coach in Saints history in 2006. Payton has always been known for his offensive prowess, having scored more points (2,804) and gained more yards (40,158) than any other team in a coach's first 100 games in NFL history.[1] Payton has the second-longest NFL tenure among active head coaches, behind New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, who has coached them since the 2000 season. Under Payton's leadership, the Saints made the 2006 NFL playoffs after a disappointing 3–13 season in 2005 and advan

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Doug Pederson

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Doug Pederson

Douglas Irving Pederson (born January 31, 1968) is an American football coach and former player who is currently the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. He served as the offensive coordinator of the Kansas City Chiefs from 2013 to 2015. He spent most of his playing career as a member of the Green Bay Packers, serving as a backup quarterback to Brett Favre and holder on placekicks, and winning Super Bowl XXXI with the team over the New England Patriots. He was also a backup to Dan Marino as a member of the Miami Dolphins, and a starting quarterback for the Eagles and Cleveland Browns. In his second season as the Eagles' head coach, Pederson won Super Bowl LII (also against the Patriots), marking the first Super Bowl title in franchise history. He also became just the fourth person, after Mike Ditka, Tom Flores and Tony Dungy to win a Super Bowl as both a player and head coach.[1] Playing career Early years Pederson was born in Bellingham, Washington, in 1968. He attended F

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Don Shula

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Don Shula

Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930) is a former American football coach. He is best known for his time being the longtime head coach of the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL), leading them to two Super Bowl victories, as well as the only perfect season in NFL history. He was previously the head coach of the Baltimore Colts, with whom he won the 1968 NFL Championship. Shula was drafted out of John Carroll University in the 1951 NFL Draft, and he played professionally as a defensive back for the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Colts, and Washington Redskins. Shula was named 1993 Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated. He had only two losing seasons in his 33-year career as a head coach in the NFL. He led his teams to six Super Bowls. In Super Bowl III, his first, the Colts set the record for the longest period to be shut out, not scoring until 3:19 remained in the game, which was later broken in Super Bowl VII. At his next Super Bowl, the Dolphins set the Super Bowl record for the lo

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George Seifert

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George Seifert

George Gerald Seifert (born January 22, 1940) is an American former football coach and player. He served as the head coach for the San Francisco 49ers[1] and the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL).[2] Seifert owned the second greatest winning percentage in NFL history by a head coach at the time of his resignation as the 49ers head coach, second to Guy Chamberlin.[3] Early career Seifert was raised in San Francisco and ushered at 49ers home games at Kezar Stadium while he attended San Francisco Polytechnic High School across the street.[4] He attended the University of Utah, playing guard and linebacker for the Utes. He served as graduate assistant at his alma mater for a year before being hired as head coach of Westminster College in Salt Lake City at age 25,[5] where he led the Parsons to a 3–3 record. After working as an assistant at the University of Iowa, the University of Oregon, and Stanford University,[6] Seifert was hired as head coach at Cornell University. He was fired after

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Mike Shanahan

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Mike Shanahan

Michael Edward Shanahan (born August 24, 1952) is a former American football coach, best known as the head coach of the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL) from 1995 to 2008. During his 14 seasons with the Broncos, he led the team to consecutive Super Bowl victories in XXXII and XXXIII, including the franchise's first NFL title in the former. His head coaching career spanned a total of 20 seasons and also included stints with the Los Angeles Raiders and Washington Redskins. He is the father of San Francisco 49ers' head coach Kyle Shanahan. Early career Shanahan played high school football at East Leyden High School, Franklin Park, Illinois, where he played wishbone quarterback for legendary Eagles coach Jack Leese's 1968 and 1969 teams. Shanahan held the single-game rushing record of 260 yards on 15 carries (which was set in a 32–8 win over Hinsdale South on September 20, 1969) until it was broken in 1976 by Dennis Cascio.[1] He graduated from high school in 1970.[2] He was a quarterback a

Super Bowl-winning head coaches

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Oklahoma Sooners football coaches

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East Leyden High School alumni

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Hank Stram

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Hank Stram

Henry Louis Stram (January 3, 1923 – July 4, 2005) was an American football coach. He is best known for his 15-year tenure with the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL). Stram won three AFL championships, more than any other coach in the league's history. He then won Super Bowl IV with the Chiefs, thus earning the 1969 World Championship of Professional Football. He also coached the most victories (87), had the most post-season games (7) and the best post-season record in the AFL (5–2). Stram is largely responsible for the introduction of Gatorade to the NFL due to his close association with Ray Graves, coach at the University of Florida during Gatorade's development and infancy. Stram never had an offensive coordinator, defensive coordinator, or special teams coach during his career with the Texans and Chiefs. Biography Early life Stram was born in Chicago on January 3, 1923.[1] His Polish-born father, Henry Wilczek, wrestled professiona

Players of American football from Indiana

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Sportspeople from Gary, Indiana

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Sports terminology

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Mike Tomlin

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Mike Tomlin

Michael Pettaway Tomlin (born March 15, 1972) is an American football coach who is head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL), having led the team since 2007. Tomlin was the youngest head coach in NFL history to win a Super Bowl, doing so at the age of 36 in Super Bowl XLIII against the Arizona Cardinals. Early life Tomlin was born in Hampton, Virginia,[1] the younger of two sons; his brother, Eddie, is three and a half years older. Their father, Ed Tomlin, played football at Hampton Institute in the 1960s, was drafted by the Baltimore Colts, and later played for the Montreal Alouettes in the Canadian Football League. The elder Tomlin died in January 2012 from an apparent heart attack in Ocala, Florida, at the age of 63. However, Tomlin hardly knew his birth father and was raised by his mother and stepfather, Julia and Leslie Copeland, who married when Tomlin was six years old. Tomlin graduated in 1990 from Denbigh High School in Newport News, Virginia. He attended the Coll

Players of American football from Virginia

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Pittsburgh Steelers currentteam parameter articles

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Super Bowl-winning head coaches

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Bill Walsh (American football coach)

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Bill Walsh (American football coach)

William Ernest Walsh (November 30, 1931 – July 30, 2007) was an American professional and college football coach. He served as head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and the Stanford Cardinal football team, during which time he popularized the West Coast offense. After retiring from the 49ers, Walsh worked as a sports broadcaster for several years and then returned as head coach at Stanford for three seasons. Walsh went 102–63–1 with the 49ers, winning 10 of his 14 postseason games along with six division titles, three NFC Championship titles, and three Super Bowls. He was named NFL Coach of the Year in 1981 and 1984. In 1993, he was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Early life Born in Los Angeles, Walsh played running back in the San Francisco Bay Area for Hayward High School in Hayward.[1] Walsh played quarterback at the College of San Mateo for two seasons. (Both John Madden and Walsh played and coached at the College of San Mateo early in their careers.) After playing at the College of San Mateo

High school football coaches in California

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Continental Football League coaches

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San Jose State University alumni

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Barry Switzer

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Barry Switzer

Barry Layne Switzer (born October 5, 1937) is a former American football coach and player. He served for 16 years as head football coach at the University of Oklahoma and 4 years as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He won three national championships at Oklahoma, and led the Cowboys to win Super Bowl XXX against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He has one of the highest winning percentages of any college football coach in history,[1] and is one of only three head coaches to win both a college football national championship and a Super Bowl, the others being Jimmy Johnson and Pete Carroll.[2] Early life and career Switzer was born on October 5, 1937, in Crossett, Arkansas, to parents Frank Mays Switzer and Mary Louise Switzer.[3] Barry and his younger brother, Donnie, were at home in rural Ashley County, Arkansas with their mother and father when, in early February 1954, it was raided by the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission and the Arkansas State Police. The Commi

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Sportspeople from Norman, Oklahoma

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Businesspeople from Oklahoma

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Dick Vermeil

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Dick Vermeil

Richard Albert Vermeil (born October 30, 1936) is an American former football head coach for the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles (1976–1982), St. Louis Rams (1997–1999) and Kansas City Chiefs (2001–2005). He coached the Rams to their only NFL title in St. Louis over the Tennessee Titans. He is in the Sid Gillman coaching tree and has coached at every level; Vermeil owns the distinction of being named "Coach of the Year" on four levels: high school, junior college, NCAA Division I, and professional football. In all three of his stints as an NFL head coach, Vermeil took every team—Philadelphia, St. Louis and Kansas City, each of which had a losing record before he arrived—and brought them to the playoffs by his third season at the helm. Early coaching years Vermeil graduated in 1959 with a Master of Arts from San Jose State University[1], where he was the backup quarterback. After serving as assistant coach for San Jose's Del Mar High School football team for one season, he served for three se

High school football coaches in California

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Super Bowl-winning head coaches

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NFL Europe broadcasters

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Mike McCarthy

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Mike McCarthy

Michael John McCarthy (born November 10, 1963) is an American football head coach of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He is also the former head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 2006 to 2018, leading them to a win in Super Bowl XLV. He was previously the offensive coordinator for the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints. Early life and playing career McCarthy was born and raised in Pittsburgh. His father was a firefighter for the Pittsburgh Fire Bureau and officer for the Pittsburgh Police, as well as a bar owner, who raised McCarthy as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan.[1][2] McCarthy was a tight end at Scottsdale Community College[3] before transferring to Baker University, an NAIA school located in Baldwin City, Kansas.[4] Coaching career College After serving as a graduate assistant at Fort Hays State from 1987 to 1988, McCarthy returned home to Pittsburgh and was hired in 1989 to work under Mike Gottfried and then later Paul Hackett at the University of Pittsburgh, where he

Baker Wildcats football players

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Fort Hays State Tigers football coaches

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Sportspeople from Pittsburgh

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